Events and Registration

BHAW 2019

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Monday, September 30th

brain tree

Navigating the World of Memory and Dementia

Dr. Antoine Hakim, Keynote Speaker presenting “Save Your Mind – Seven Rules to Avoid Dementia”

Proclamation of Brain Health Awareness Week

Time: 5:30 pm -7:00 pm
Registration: 5:00 pm -5:30 pm
Location: uOttawa Roger Guindon Bldg., 451 Smyth Rd, Amphitheatre A

One of the greatest gifts of the human brain is the ability to navigate through space. As children grow, they hone this skill every time they leave home and find their way back. We use it every time we go to the bank, make our way to the kitchen, or go to the airport for a trip. Without this key function, humans would not have been able to build roads, streets, and sidewalks—let alone travel on them.

Unfortunately as people age—and especially for those facing additional cognitive decline—there can be a loss in this sense of direction. When this happens, older adults stop exploring new and different locations. This decrease in mobility can lead to decreased social participation, which in turn can exacerbate their cognitive challenges.

What is the nature of this intimate connection between navigation and cognition? How do we learn to navigate? How can we reduce the impact of memory loss on our ability to navigate the world?

Join us as we explore these vital questions. Dr. Heidi Sveistrup, CEO and Chief Scientific Officer of the Bruyère Research Institute, will be opening the evening with brief introductions. Then, Dr. Nafissa Ismail, from the School of Psychology at the University of Ottawa, will present on navigation from a basic research perspective. Next,  Dr. Frank Knoefel, from the Bruyère Memory Program, will talk about what it means to you lose your ability to navigate the world—particularly when it comes to driving. We will then welcome Dr. Antoine Hakim, who will provide vital insight on what you can do to help prevent the onset of dementia.

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Tuesday October 1st

stroke

Can the Brain Repair Itself After Stroke?

Time: 5:30 pm -7:00 pm
Registration: 5:00 pm -5:30 pm
Location: uOttawa Roger Guindon Bldg., 451 Smyth Rd, Amphitheatre A

 

A stroke is caused by a sudden loss of blood flow to part of the brain, rapidly changing the way the brain and the individual function. Most strokes lead to the rapid onset of motor or cognitive deficits as the brain regions controlling these functions are deprived of sufficient energy and nutrients to work properly.

Advances in the emergency room treatment of stroke with approved clot-busting drugs and new surgical methods clinically tested in Ottawa are helping more individuals survive a stroke through restoration of blood flow. This is tremendous progress as more lives are being saved, however it has also left  a growing number of stroke survivors with life-long disabilities (~400,000 in Canada). Remarkably, the brain is capable of healing itself.  Lost functions can be re-gained through the formation of new connections and pathways within the brain. This “natural” ability of the brain to heal itself needs additional support since the improvements that occur are often limited to a short time after a stroke and leave many survivors with lasting disabilities. We are working on developing novel approaches to accelerate brain repair.

This interactive forum will allow you to come and meet our faculty and research teams working to promote stroke recovery.  Learn about ongoing trials such as RecoveryNow or virtual reality that are getting patients active after a stroke and challenging the brain. Hear about what is happening in our labs that are unraveling the mystery of how the brain fights to repair itself after a stroke through regeneration and reorganization, as we aim to design new treatments to help the brain repair itself. 

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Wednesday October 2nd

MS

Moving for Multiple Sclerosis: Why You Should Exercise and How You Can Make it Happen

Time: 5:30 pm -7:00 pm
Registration: 5:00 pm -5:30 pm
Location: uOttawa Roger Guindon Bldg., 451 Smyth Rd, Amphitheatre A

Over the past two decades, beliefs about exercise for people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) have changed dramatically – from fear and caution that exercising could make MS worse, to the potential for changing the course of the disease. We now know that exercise is safe and has many benefits for people living with MS, yet many people find it challenging to exercise. This presents a call to action for researchers and health care providers to develop innovative strategies and approaches to deliver the benefits of exercise to everyone affected by this disease.

Please join researchers, clinicians, and patients as we highlight the past, present, and future of exercise for people living with MS and for those affected around them. We will address key questions, such as ‘How much exercise is enough?’, ‘How can people with MS be active?’, and ‘Can exercise delay disease progression?’ Personal experiences of living with MS and exercise participation will be shared. We will discuss the impact of MS on the health and wellbeing of support partners, and highlight new exercise interventions for people with MS and those who care for them together. Innovative approaches in exercise delivery will be explored. We will conclude with an opportunity for questions for the presenters.

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Thursday October 3rd

Mental Health

Negotiating the Storms of Adolescence: Cannabinoids, Depression & Self-Harm

Time: 5:30 pm -7:00 pm
Registration: 5:00 pm -5:30 pm
Location: uOttawa Roger Guindon Bldg., 451 Smyth Rd, Amphitheatre A

Adolescence is a time of change from childhood to being a young adult. It's when children work out how to be part of the family but also separate from it. This can lead to behavior which seeks to break family bonds and also feelings of loss. When extreme this can present as depression, self-harm and experimenting with substances. This evening will have experts in child psychiatry, population health and the science of cannabis discussing how adolescents and families can navigate these storms.

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Friday October 4th

neural dynamics image

Decoding Brain Circuits and Cracking the Neural Code: The Physical Basis of Perception, Memory, Mood, and Thought

Time: 5:30 pm -7:00 pm
Registration: 5:00 pm -5:30 pm
Location: uOttawa Roger Guindon Bldg., 451 Smyth Rd, Amphitheatre A

How do we perceive? Acquire new skills? Recall past events? Recognize familiar faces? Guide our everyday decisions based on our past experience? How and why does our mood affects these decisions? How do neurological and psychiatric diseases alter these functions?  

These are amongst the deepest and most complex questions that the field of Neuroscience seeks to answer. Whereas ongoing research is revealing which parts of the brain participate in several of these functions, the next frontier lies in understanding the elusive neural code and the nature of the neural operations occurring in brain circuits.

Moreover, individual brain cells and circuits constantly adapt during our everyday experience: How does this plasticity underlie the stunning ability of the brain to learn? Neuroscientist Prof. Béïque and neurophysicist Prof. Longtin will outline some of the current theories and discoveries that are shaping our still rudimentary understanding of how brain circuits create our ability to dynamically and purposefully interact with the outside world.  Prof. Naud will outline some of the current theories and discoveries that are shaping our still rudimentary understanding of how brain circuits create our ability to dynamically and purposefully interact with the outside world.

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